Syria

Overview

Country Syria Capital : Damascus

Syria has a population of over 17 million.

Agriculture is an important source of income for Syrians. It provides work for about one-fourth of the population. Wheat is the most important food crop, although its production is subject to great fluctuations in rainfall. Sugar beet production is also significant. Barley, corn (maize) and millet are the other important grains. Cotton is the largest and most reliable export crop. Lentils are a major domestic food, but they also are exported.

Other fruits and vegetables include tomatoes, potatoes, melons and onions. Furthermore olives, grapes and apples are grown at high altitudes, while citrus fruits are cultivated along the coast.

14-23% of the food energy consumed in Syria comes from crops that are not native to the region. Most of these plants’ diversity is found elsewhere on the planet.

The Crop Trust has supported 7 projects in Syria

  1. Barley: The Crop Trust supported the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) to evaluate 270 barley accessions for several drought stress related traits with the aim of giving scientist an understanding of plant adaptation to drought and also to help breeders develop more drought tolerant varieties. The project also resulted the training of 13 persons from 4 countries.
  2. Barley: The Crop Trust supported the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) to develop dynamic trait specific GIS-based subset for barley landraces in ICARDA genebank by using ecogeographic data and distribution maps of major biotic and abiotic stresses to predict areas of high selection pressures for related trait, with the aim of getting information that will be used to derive sub-samples of accessions for each major biotic and abiotic constraint for introduction into appropriate screening programs.
  3. Barley, Faba Bean, Grasspea, Lentil: The International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) receives an in-perpetuity grant from the Crop Trust for the long-term conservation of the global collections of barley, forages, faba bean, grass pea and lentil it holds on behalf of the international community.
  4. Chickpea: The Crop Trust supported the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) to develop dynamic trait specific GIS-based subset for chickpea landraces in ICARDA genebank by using Eco geographic data and distribution maps of major biotic and abiotic stresses to predict areas of high selection pressures for related trait, with the aim of getting information that will be used to derive sub-samples of accessions for each major biotic and abiotic constraint for introduction into appropriate screening programs.
  5. Grasspea: The International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) received funding from the Crop Trust to evaluate cultivated and wild Lathyrus species for low ß-ODAP neurotoxin content and cross pollination rate with the aim of identifying germplasm lines for use in developing suitable varieties for use by farmers in the grasspea growing areas of the world.
  6. Lentil: The Crop Trust supported the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) to develop dynamic trait specific GIS-based subset for lentil landraces in ICARDA genebank by using Eco geographic data and distribution maps of major biotic and abiotic stresses to predict areas of high selection pressures for related trait, with the aim of getting information that will be used to derive sub-samples of accessions for each major biotic and abiotic constraint for introduction into appropriate screening programs.
  7. Wheat: The Crop Trust supported the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) to evaluate wheat and other cereals for resistance to major diseases and pests with the aim of identifying sources of tolerance and making it available to breeders.