Israel

Overview

Country Israel Capital : Jerusalem

Israel has a population of over 8 million people, including the populations of the Golan Heights and East Jerusalem, annexed by Israel after 1967.

Israel’s gross national product after 1948 has benefited from a large influx of well-trained and Western-educated European and North American immigrants. It has a population of over 8 million people. The country has obtained large amounts of capital from sources such as gifts from world Jewry, reparations from the Federal Republic of Germany for Nazi crimes, grants-in-aid from the U.S. government and capital brought in by immigrants.

The rural sector makes up less than one-tenth of the total Jewish population. Israel cultivates citrus and industrial crops such as peanuts (groundnuts), sugar beets and cotton, as well as vegetables and flowers.

28-42% of the food energy consumed in Israel comes from crops that are not native to the region. Most of these plants’ diversity is found elsewhere on the planet.

The Crop Trust has supported 4 projects in Israel

  1. Barley: The Institute for Cereal Crops Improvement (ICCI) received support from the Crop Trust to regenerate, characterize and safety duplicate 600 barley accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops. The accessions are backed up at the Svalbard Global Seed Vault in Norway.
  2. Barley: The Crop Trust supported the Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, Israel to recollect wild barley and undertake a comparative evaluation of old and newly collected germplasm for drought resistance with the aim of identifying best performing genotypes and making them available for further studies and breeding. A total of 36 genotypes were found to be resistant to drought.
  3. Wheat: The Institute for Cereal Crops Improvement (ICCI) received support from the Crop Trust to regenerate, characterize and safety duplicate 300 wheat accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  4. Wheat: The Crop Trust supported the Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, Israel to recollect and test wild wheat for drought resistance with the objective of assessing the impact of climate change and identifying best performing genotypes in order to make these available for additional studies and breeding