Mozambique

Overview

Country Mozambique Capital : Maputo

Mozambique has a population of over around 26 million.

Agriculture employs about four-fifths of the country’s workforce, but only constitutes about one-fifth of Mozambique’s GDP.

The two staple crops of corn (maize)—in which Mozambique was self-sufficient by 1997—and cassava, as well as beans, rice and a variety of vegetables and oilseeds such as peanuts (groundnuts), sesame and sunflowers. Plantation crops developed during the colonial era such as sugar, tea, copra and sisal, are still produced by private plantations, state farms, government-sponsored cooperatives, and communal villages.

86-94% of the food energy consumed in Mozambique comes from crops that are not native to the region. Most of these plants’ diversity is found elsewhere on the planet.

The Crop Trust has supported 5 projects in Mozambique

  1. Beans: The Crop Trust supported the Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM) to regenerate 47 accessions of common bean with the aim of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  2. Cassava: The Crop Trust supported the Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM), which collaborated with University of the Free State in South Africa and the Department of Agriculture, Malawi to genotype and evaluate cassava collections in Malawi and Mozambique for starch characteristics.
  3. Cowpea: The Crop Trust supported the Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM) to regenerate 98 cowpea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crop.
  4. Maize: The Crop Trust supported the Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM) to regenerate 161 maize accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crop.
  5. Sorghum: The Crop Trust supported the Instituto de Investigação Agrária de Moçambique (IIAM) to regenerate 137 accession of sorghum with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crop.