Filter by

Philippines

Overview

Country Philippines Capital : Manila

The Philippines has a population of around 100 million people. The agriculture and food sector in the Philippines accounts for almost 15-20% of gross national income.

It employs around 32% of the country’s working population and agricultural and food trade generates up to 10% of national exports. Agricultural production focuses on the following food crops: rice, coconut, banana, maize, and cassava.

27-38% of the food energy consumed in the Philippines comes from crops that are not native to the region. Most of these plants’ diversity is found elsewhere on the planet. There are 155,660 crop varieties in collections of crop diversity found in the Philippines compared to the more than 700,000 found in the international collections of crop diversity supported by the Crop Trust.

The Philippines signed the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA) in 2006, joining 132 other contracting parties in commitment to the global system.

The Crop Trust has supported 16 projects in Philippines

  1. Aroids: The Crop Trust supported the National Plant Genetic Resources Laboratory (NPGRL) at the University of the Philippines Los Banos to regenerate and characterize 52 taro accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  2. The National Plant Genetic Resources Laboratory (NPGRL) of the University of the Philippines Los Banos received an emergency grant from the Crop Trust for the rescue of its national germplasm collections, following the damage caused by the typhoon Milenyo in September 2006.
  3. Banana: The UPLB Foundation Inc. through the Institute of Plant Breeding-Crop Science Cluster at the University of Philippines, Los Banos evaluated 44 accessions of wild and edible Musa balbisiana for drought tolerance and the impact of drought on the activation of infectious endogenous banana streak virus with the aim of identifying germplasm needed in the development of banana hybrid cultivars adapted to climate change challenges such as drought and making it available to breeders.
  4. Banana: The Crop Trust supported the Bureau of Plant Industry (BPI) to regenerate and characterize 214 banana accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing the use of the crop.
  5. Banana: The Crop Trust supported the University of Los Banos to regenerate and characterize 157 accessions of banana with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing the use of the crop. 30 accessions are safety duplicated at Bioversity international.
  6. Banana: The Crop Trust supported Bioversity International that worked in collaboration with Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences of China to evaluate East African highland banana and plantain cultivars held by Bioversity international for resistance to Fusarium oxysporum with the aim of identifying new sources of resistance to the pathogen and making the material available to breeders for variety development in the Africa.
  7. Cowpea: The Crop Trust supported the National Plant Genetic Resources Laboratory (NPGRL) at the University of the Philippines Los Banos to regenerate and characterize 756 cowpea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops. 608 accessions are safety duplicated in the World Vegetable Centre (AVRDC).
  8. Maize: The Crop Trust supported the National Plant Genetic Resources Laboratory (NPGRL) at the University of the Philippines Los Banos to regenerate, characterize and safety duplicate 710 maize accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops. 539 accessions are safety duplicated in the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT).
  9. Pigeon Pea: The Crop Trust supported the National Plant Genetic Resources Laboratory (NPGRL) at the University of the Philippines Los Banos to regenerate, characterize and safety duplicate 18 pigeon pea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  10. Rice: The Crop Trust supported the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in its coordination of the International Network for Genetic Evaluation of Rice (INGER), which evaluated 455 accessions of rice for heat tolerance for the benefit of breeders who are developing varieties to address the challenges of climate change. 23 accessions were selected as potential sources of genes for heat tolerance
  11. Rice: The International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) receives an in-perpetuity grant from the Crop Trust for the long-term conservation of the collection of rice it manages on behalf of the international community.
  12. Rice: The Crop Trust supported the National Plant Genetic Resources Laboratory (NPGRL) at the University of the Philippines Los Banos to regenerate, characterize and safety duplicate 479 rice accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  13. Rice: The Philippines Rice Research Institute developed a recurrent selection scheme for rice and used this to produce inbred lines with enhanced yield to produce elite germplasm that is made available to breeders for use in developing varieties with enhanced yield.
  14. Sweet Potato: The Crop Trust supported the National Plant Genetic Resources Laboratory (NPGRL) at the University of the Philippines Los Banos to regenerate and characterize 897 sweet potato accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  15. Yam: The Crop Trust supported the National Plant Genetic Resources Laboratory (NPGRL) at the University of the Philippines Los Banos to regenerate, characterize and safety duplicate 739 yam accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops. It is also introducing 263 yam accessions from PhilRootCrops into tissue culture.
  16. Yam: The Crop Trust provided support to PhilRootCrops, Visayas State University to regenerate, characterize and safety duplicate 238 yam accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crop.