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Chickpea

Overview

Crop Chickpea Cicer Center of origin: SAS, SEM, WAS

Chickpea, or garbanzo, is a crop of relatively minor importance on the world market, but it is extremely important to local trade in numerous regions within the tropics and sub-tropics.

Chickpea is grown and consumed in large quantities from Southeast Asia across the Indian sub-continent, and throughout the Middle East and Mediterranean countries, playing an important cultural as well as nutritional role. More recently chickpea has also grown in popularity in Africa and in Latin America, and by 2005 there was significant production in 54 countries worldwide.

Chickpea has one of the best nutritional compositions of any dry edible legume and does not contain any specific major anti-nutritional or toxic factors. On average chickpea seed contains about 23% protein. Chickpea production depends on few expensive or environmentally detrimental inputs. The crop meets up to 80% of its nitrogen requirement from symbiotic nitrogen fixation and can fix up to 140 kg nitrogen hectare per season from the air.

Chickpea has a much higher yield potential than is currently achieved. Breeding for higher yields is therefore a major objective of chickpea breeders.

Conserving forever in genebanks

Filter by genebanks

ICARDA

Number of varieties available to the public
58.5% 8,725
Data available in genesys
0% 0
Safety duplicated
70.3% 10,476

ICRISAT

Number of varieties available to the public
72.4% 14,672
Data available in genesys
92.7% 18,791
Safety duplicated
18.7% 3,800

Breakdown of genebanks conserving Chickpea

  • ICARDA 14,906 / 42.4%
  • ICRISAT 20,267 / 57.6%

The Crop Trust has supported 13 projects for Chickpea

  1. Albania: The Crop Trust supported the Agricultural Technology Transfer Center Lushnja (ATTCL) to regenerate and characterize 6 chickpea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of these crops.
  2. Australia: The Crop Trust supported the Department of Primary Industries, Victoria to evaluate 246 chickpea accessions held by the Australian Temperate Field Crops (ATFCC) for resistances to phytophtera and aschochyta with the objective of identifying sources of disease resistance and providing increased access of these to breeders globally, thereby increasing the effective and efficient use of these genetic resources.
  3. Azerbaijan: The Crop Trust supported the Genetic Resources Institute of the National Academy of Sciences to regenerate, characterize and safety duplicate 65 chickpea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of these crops.
  4. Bangladesh: The Crop Trust supported the Plant Genetic Resources Centre of the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI) to regenerate and characterize 50 chickpea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of these crops.
  5. Bulgaria: The Crop Trust supported the Institute of Plant Genetic Resources to regenerate, characterize and safety duplicate 30 chickpea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  6. Georgia: The Georgia State Agrarian University (GSAU) received support from the Crop Trust to regenerate and characterize 61 chickpea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops. 41 accessions are safety duplicated in the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Area (ICARDA).
  7. Hungary: The Crop Trust supported the Research Centre for Agrobotany (RCA) to regenerate and characterize 22 chickpea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  8. Nepal: The Crop Trust supported the Agriculture Botany Division, NARI to regenerate, characterize and safety duplicate 267 chickpea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  9. Pakistan: The Crop Trust supported the Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology and Genetic Resources, Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC) to evaluate indigenous chickpea for traits of economic importance for farmers with the objective of making material identified as promising to plant breeders for use in crop improvement programs.
  10. Pakistan: The Crop Trust provided support to the Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology and Genetic Resources, Pakistan Agricultural Research Council (PARC), to regenerate and characterize 530 chickpea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops. 324 accessions are safety duplicated in Pakistan.
  11. Russia: The Crop Trust provided support to the N.I. Vavilov Research Institute for Plant Industry (VIR) to regenerate, characterize and safety duplicate 50 chickpea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  12. Syria: The Crop Trust supported the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) to develop dynamic trait specific GIS-based subset for chickpea landraces in ICARDA genebank by using Eco geographic data and distribution maps of major biotic and abiotic stresses to predict areas of high selection pressures for related trait, with the aim of getting information that will be used to derive sub-samples of accessions for each major biotic and abiotic constraint for introduction into appropriate screening programs.
  13. Ukraine: The National Center for Plant Genetic Resources of Ukraine (NCPGRU) received support from the Crop Trust to regenerate and characterize 280 chickpea accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops. 215 accessions are safety duplicated in the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA).