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Faba Bean

Overview

Crop Faba Bean Vicia faba Center of origin: WAS

Also known as broad bean, fava bean, horse bean, field bean and tick bean, the faba bean is one of the easiest crops to cultivate.

It grows well at high altitudes in the sub-tropics as well as in temperate regions.

The cultural roots of the crop can be traced back to descriptions in Homer, and in ancient Greece and Rome the beans were used in voting; a white bean being used to cast a yes vote, and a black bean for no.

Faba bean seeds are consumed from green to dry, and pods are eaten when young. The grain is one of the most important winter crops in the Middle East. Faba bean is a common breakfast food in the Middle East, Mediterranean region, China and Ethiopia. Worldwide the faba bean crop is mostly used for animal feed, mainly for pigs, horses, poultry and pigeons. The straw is also used for brick making and as a fuel in parts of Sudan and Ethiopia.

Faba bean’s high diversity and adaptability means it is grown from the equator to almost the Arctic Circle, and from sea level to very high altitudes. The different names reflect the variation within the species, with broad bean meaning the large-seeded cultivars grown for human food, while horse bean and field bean refer to cultivars with smaller, harder seeds used for animal feed.

Conserving forever in genebanks

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ICARDA

Number of varieties available to the public
17.1% 1,706
Data available in genesys
0% 0
Safety duplicated
60.6% 6,060

Breakdown of genebanks conserving Faba Bean

  • ICARDA 10,002 / 100%

The Crop Trust has supported 12 projects for Faba Bean

  1. Albania: The Crop Trust supported the Agricultural Technology Transfer Center Lushnja to regenerate and characterize 13 faba bean accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of these crops.
  2. Azerbaijan: The Crop Trust supported the Genetic Resources Institute of the National Academy of Sciences to regenerate and characterize 14 faba bean accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of these crops. All accessions are safety duplicated at the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA).
  3. Bulgaria: The Crop Trust supported the Institute of Plant Genetic Resources to regenerate and characterize 38 faba bean accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops. 26 accessions are safety duplicated at the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA).
  4. Ecuador: The Instituto Nacional Autónomo de Investigaciones Agropecuarias received support from the Crop Trust to regenerate and characterize 208 faba bean accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops. All accessions are safety duplicated at the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA).
  5. Georgia: The Georgia State Agrarian University received support from the Crop Trust to regenerate and characterize seven faba bean accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops. All accessions are safety duplicated at the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA).
  6. Hungary: The Crop Trust supported the Research Centre for Agrobotany in regenerate and characterize 139 bean accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  7. Kenya: The National Genebank, Kenya Agricultural Research Institute received support from the Crop Trust to regenerate and characterize 31 bean accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  8. Peru: The Crop Trust provided support to the Instituto Nacional de Innovación Agraria (INIA) to regenerate and characterize 250 faba bean accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  9. Portugal: The Crop Trust supported the Instituto Nacional dos Recursos Biológicos (INRB) to regenerate and characterize 31 faba bean accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crop. 32 accessions are safety duplicated in Centro di Recursos Fitogeneticos, Spain.
  10. Russia: The Crop Trust provided support to the N.I. Vavilov Research Institute of Plant Industry (VIR) to regenerate and characterize 300 faba bean accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.
  11. Syria: The International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) receives an in-perpetuity grant from the Crop Trust for the long-term conservation of the global collections of barley, forages, faba bean, grass pea and lentil it holds on behalf of the international community.
  12. Yemen: The Agricultural Research & Extension authority (AREA) received support from the Crop Trust to regenerate and characterize 22 faba bean accessions with the objective of rescuing threatened diversity and enhancing use of the crops.