In the News

Indigenous Peoples Hold the Past and Future of Food in Their Hands

Alejandro Argumedo | Food Tank

August 9 was the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples – a celebration of the uniqueness of the traditions of Quechua, Huli, Zapotec, and thousands of other cultures, but also of the universality of potatoes, bananas, beans, and the rest of the foods that nourish the world. These crops did not arise out of thin air. They were domesticated over thousands of years, and continue to be nurtured, by Indigenous people. On this day we give thanks to these cultures for the diversity of our food.

Yes, even in a globalized world and food system. Most diversity in crops – and livestock – is still found in the regions where they have been around longest, adapting to climatic extremes, pests, and diseases through millennia interaction with human cultures – as we have weathered our own storms and pandemics. Known as primary regions of crop and livestock diversity, these places are central to the present and future viability of food systems. They are also the homelands of many Indigenous peoples.

Read the full opinion by AlejandRo Argumendo on Food Tank.

News

Filter by
  • News
  • Social
Blog

Fast-Tracking Food Security Using Space Science

Read More
Blog

A Wild Way to Boost Wheat Yields

Read More
Blog

Supercharging Nutrition with Wild Chickpea Relatives

Read More
Blog

Brushing Off Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

Read More
Science Blog

Serving Up Fruit and Vegetable Diversity

Read More
Blog

Flourishing in her Field

Read More
Blog

New Alfalfa Varieties Take Root

Read More
Blog

Vision for 2030: Closing the Gap Between Ideal and Reality

Read More
Blog

Stay-Green Sorghum to the Rescue

Read More
Blog

Strawberry Seeds Deposited at the First Svalbard Global Seed Vault Opening of 2021

Read More
Blog

A Sweet Deposit to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault

Read More
Blog

16 Women Scientists Securing the Future of our Food

Read More
Blog

Reflections on the Dasgupta Review

Read More